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Phoenix
Perseverance

Prince Regent
Pegasus
Click on the name of the ship to read more about it.  If you are able to add more information, are seeking information or are connected to any of these ships through your ancestory, please submit a comment.

 
 
Providence
Peruvian
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Tuatara, Nikau & Gulls by Carolyn Morgan

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Making Peoples: A History of the New Zealanders, from Polynesian Settlement to the End of the Nineteenth Century
Making Peoples: A History of the New Zealanders, from Polynesian Settlement to the End of the Nineteenth Century

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Historical Dictionary of New Zealand
Historical Dictionary of New Zealand
"The dictionary includes hundreds of cross-referenced entries on important persons, places, events, institutions as well as significant political, economic, social and cultural aspects."
Fishpond
Prince of Denmark
Prudent
HMS Pandora
Persian
Proteus
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HMS Pandora
In February 1828 HMS Pandora, Captain Jervois, called at the Bay of Islands for three days. While there, Captain Jervois asked the mission station to acquire for him two bags of flax seeds, as the Admiralty wanted him to transport them to Ceylon. With great difficulty, and apparently very little appreciation, a quantity flax seeds were delivered to the ship just as she was making her way out of the harbour.
 
Persian
At the end of 1835, the barque Persian was sent to Otago from Sydney to collect the balance of the seasonís oil taken by the Weller brothers' station there. After delivering the oil to Sydney in January, Persian then proceeded on to London with a full cargo of oil.
 
Peruvian
In November 1823 the American whaling ship Peruvian called at the Bay of Islands. The ship was from Nantucket, and Captain Clark was at her helm.
 
Phoenix
In early March 1815 Captain William Parker arrived at the Bay of Islands on his ship Phoenix from the fishery where they had been for the best part of eight months. Parker was no stranger to the Bay. He was captain of Diana in 1810 when the whalers launched their attack on Te Pahiís pa in retaliation for those who died on Boyd. Parker and Phoenix made another brief visit to the Bay of Islands in June 1815 before heading on to Sydney. Later that year the crew of Phoenix attempted to pull down the missionary Thomas Kendallís house in New Zealand. On seeing this, a large number of Maori, descended on the would-be vandals and they sailors were lucky to escape with their lives. Phoenix was sailing in company with Cretan, and the two ships left the Bay of Islands together on November 30. Phoenix made two brief stops at the Bay of Islands in 1823 and 1824 under Captain Palmer. On both occasions she had come from the fishery and was carrying 1300 barrels of whale oil.
 
Pocklington
Captain Jones was in the Bay of Islands on Pocklington in early 1824. He departed the bay in February, and was headed for the fishery. It wasnít until 13 months later that Jones sailed Pocklington back into the Bay, having taken 130 tons of sperm whale oil. The following month when they sailed for Sydney, Jones had on board the Missionary William Hall, and survivors of the wreck of the ship Mercury.
 
Prince of Denmark
In 1825 Captain William Stewart took a trading and sealing voyage around the islands of New Zealand on the Prince of Denmark. When he returned to Sydney he had a cargo of several hundred seal skins, but more importantly than that he had arrived back at the colony with grand designs of beginning his own settlement. Evidently his enthusiasm was infectious, and within a short space of time he had enlisted a group of colonists to sail with him to begin a new life on Stewart Island. On the way, Captain Stewart called into the Bay of Islands on Prince of Denmark. By now, many Europeans had begun to live at Kororareka, and Captain Stewart managed to convince several of them to join his party in setting up a timber and ship building enterprise at Port Pegasus. Among the men were William Cook, John Lee, Hugh McCurdy, Robert Day, and Ben Turner. Captain Stewartís settlement never got off the ground, and the ship builders were stranded there for nine years during which time they built the vessel Joseph Weller, and sold it to the Weller brothers. The money from the ship enabled them to get back to Sydney and from there finally back to their homes in the Bay of Islands in 1834. Captain Stewart claimed he had no way of returning for the men, having lost all of his money after sailing back to Sydney in 1826 to deliver a cargo of seal skins and flax.

In 1829 Prince of Denmark was back in New Zealand water on another sealing and speculative trip, this time under the command of Captain Skelton. In June of the following year Skelton delivered a cargo of floor boards, flax, to Sydney along with Samuel Marsden. Prince of Denmarkís next captain was Captain Jack, who embarked on a trading voyage to the Cook Strait region. When he arrived back in Sydney Captain Jack reported that there was no lack of flax, but the Maori would not trade for it. His cargo included 21 live pigs and half a ton of pork. The following month Captain Jack sailed Prince of Denmark back to New Zealand and was on hand at Tauranga when Vittoria struck rocks. Tools from Prince of Denmark were used to help repair the stricken vessel. Captain Jackís cargo when he arrived back in Sydney at the end of 1832 was 40 tons of flax and whalebone.
 
Prince Regent
Prince Regent was the colonial schooner that accompanied HMS Dromedary to New Zealand in 1820 as tender. Her captain was J.R. Kent and over the years he came to sail many different ships into the Bay of Islands. While Prince Regent was at the Bay, the chief officer of whaleship Indian died and some of the tenderís crew may have joined in the funeral procession of whaleboats as they made their way across the bay to the burial site. By September Prince Regent was ready to head back to Sydney, but Captain Kent was forced to turn his ship back when it was discovered that she was leaking badly. Another Australian ship called Prince Regent called at the Bay of Islands at the end of the same year. This ship was a whaler from Sydney and Derwent, under the command of Captain Anderson.
Proteus
In Early January 1833 Proteus, Captain Brown arrived at Sydney with 200 tons of sperm whale oil that had been procured in the South Seas fishery. In 1836 Proteus was again working in New Zealand waters and the following year she was grounded at Moeraki but the crew managed to free her before any serious damage could be done. Proteus then loaded oil at Otago and sailed for Sydney.
 
 
Providence
In 1822 James Herd sailed his ship Providence into the Bay of Islands, having come from Sydney on a trading voyage. He later left for Hokianga, taking with him Thomas Kendall who was in all sorts of strife with the mission station by this time. Kendall acted as interpreter and lived on board the ship while at Hokianga. His actions would not have done him any favours with the mission station, as the spars that James Herd was after, were traded for with muskets. In August of the same year, Kendall returned to the Bay on Providence, before Captain Herd sailed on to Valparaiso in South America.
 
Prudent
A whaleship called Prudent was reported to be at the Bay of Islands on two occasions during the summer of 1825/26. Her master was Captain Gulliver.
 

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