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New Zelander
Nereus

North America
Nimrod
Click on the name of the ship to read more about it.  If you are able to add more information, are seeking information or are connected to any of these ships through your ancestory, please submit a comment.
 
 
Norval
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The Fatal Shore
The Fatal Shore
"The history of the birth of Australia which came out of the suffering and brutality of England's infamous convict transportation system. "

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SAVAGE, J. Some account of New Zealand particularly the bay of Islands, and surrounding country; with a description of the religion and government, language, arts, manufactures, manners and customs of the natives & c. London, Edinburgh, J. Murray, A. Constable, 1807

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Historical Dictionary of New Zealand
Historical Dictionary of New Zealand
"The dictionary includes hundreds of cross-referenced entries on important persons, places, events, institutions as well as significant political, economic, social and cultural aspects."
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Nereus
On February 19 1830, Captain Rapsey sailed Nereus into Sydney Harbour. The captain, his ship and crew, had been whaling in the South Seas since they left Sydney in November of 1828. They arrived back with 80t of sperm oil for their efforts. After her long voyage, Nereus stayed under the command of Rapsey for a two month journey to New Zealand.
New Zealander
A whaleship named New Zealander, Captain Parker, may have taken part in the attack on Te Pahiís pa in the Bay of Islands in late March 1810. She had come to the Bay from the fishery. There she found five other ships; Speke, Atlanta, Inspector, Diana and Perseverance, and before long they launched their mistaken but deadly attack against the Maori chief and his people. Sometime during New Zealanders early visits to New Zealand, Philip Tapsell was onboard as first mate. Tapsell became a well known figure in the Bay of Islands and was the groom in the first Christian wedding service to be held in New Zealand.

Eight years later, the whaleship New Zealander, sailed from England under Captain Mark Munro. In February of 1819 New Zealander hove into the Bay of Islands in company of Foxhound and Ann, all having come from the fishery. New Zealander and Ann left again later in the month. By this time New Zealander had taken about 80 ton of oil. New Zealander sailed to Sydney in August where she stayed for almost three weeks before leaving for the fishery. The ship made a brief call at the Bay of Islands in December 1819, and again the following February. While there HMS Dromedary arrived and New Zealanderís crew rowed over to meet the impressive naval vessel. This was New Zealanderís last visit to the Bay of Islands, but when she left she took two of the regionís most powerful chiefs, Hongi Hika and Waikato, along with the Missionary Thomas Kendall, back to England. Arguably this journey by the New Zealander chiefs on a ship named after their people, was the catalyst for a dramatic turn in the fate of the warrior society. The weapons given to Hongi Hika by the King of England turned violent skirmishes into musket wars that enabled Maori chief to seek utu, or revenge, on a devastating scale.

In 1829 a ship called New Zealander traded around the coast of New Zealand, under Captain Clarke. In March she was trading at Tauranga where she found another trader Haweis in a state of extreme emergency having been overtaken by local Maori. Captain Clarke and his crew retook Haweis, then made stops at the Bay of Islands and Hokianga before sailing onto Sydney where they reported the story of Haweis. New Zealanderís trade cargo included potatoes and flax. For the next two years New Zealander continued to trade between New Zealand and Sydney. Captain Skelton took over from Clarke in 1830, followed by Captain Stewart later that year but it was under Captain Clarke that New Zealander arrived in Sydney in April 1831 with 36,000' pine, and 14,000' floor boards ready to sell on the market. That winter New Zealander was fitted out for whaling and joined several other ships in the Cloudy Bay area, on the north eastern corner of the South Island. Captain Gardner brought her back into Sydney in December with 17 tuns of oil. New Zealanderís command had passed onto Captain Rapsey by December 1831 when she brought 60 tons of sperm oil into Sydney from the South Seas. In March 1835 it was Captain Cole who sailed her to Sydney from Preservation Station.
Nimrod
A whaleship called Nimrod, Captain White, arrived in Sydney in March 1833 with 100 ton of sperm whale oil. Two months later she left for the whaling grounds again, this time under Captain McAuliffe. However, Nimrodís New Zealand connection was through the Weller Brothers, when they sent her to Otago in September 1836 to collect a whaling gang and the remainder of the oil theyíd taken while there. On November 2 Nimrod left New Zealand with 105 tuns of oil and thirty one men.
North America
In April of 1840 three American whaling ships were anchored in the Auckland Islands, North America, Roman and Amethyst. North America sailed on to Bluff, by now a favourite watering hole for American captains and crew. The other ships followed suit shortly after.
Norval
When Captain Harrison sailed Norval out of Sydney Harbour on 13 August 1820, he was headed for New Zealandís black whale fishery in Cook Strait. This was a popular destination for whaleships, as the whales came in close to the coastline when they made their way through the strait and along the coast of New Zealand. Norval stayed at Cloudy Bay until October, by which time her crew had taken 100 ton of black oil and traded for ten ton of flax. After dispatching her cargo to Sydney, Norval sailed back to England in 1831.