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Genii
General Gates

Glory
Glide
Click on the name of the ship to read more about it.  If you are able to add more information, are seeking information or are connected to any of these ships through your ancestory, please submit a comment.

 
 
Golconda
Governor Bligh
General Gates
On 12 August 1818 Samuel Marsdenís voyage across the Tasman Sea from Port Jackson ended when he disembarked from General Gates at the Bay of Islands. Marsden had arrived to establish a second Christian mission station at Kerikeri and brought with him John Kemp and John G Butler. General Gates was an American sealing vessel commanded by Captain A Riggs. In early April 1820 General Gates arrived at the Bay again, with Captain Riggs still at her helm. HMS Dromedary was at the time visiting New Zealand and when it was established that there were several convicts onboard General Gates that were being treated in a most brutal manner, Captain Skinner arrested Captain Riggs and put a navel crew in charge of General Gates to return the ship to Sydney. When the vessel arrived back in New South Wales on 12 May 1820, it was found to have no fewer than ten convicts and one man on board who had never been given clearance to leave Sydney. It was an unfortunate fate to be part of the crew of the General Gates in the early 1820s. In November 1822 when Captain William Edwardson of Snapper arrived at Chalky Bay in southern Fiordland, a group of sealers from General Gates were desperate to seek refuge on Snapper. They claimed their lives were in danger as they were being pursued by James Caddell, a former European ship boy who had been captured by southern Maori, and now lived among them as a tattooed rangatira, chief, taking on all their customs including cannibalism. 
Genii
One of Johnny Jonesís vessels at the height of his entrepreneurial whaling days, Genii worked off the coast of the South Island during the 1830s. In the former years her master was Captain Wells who took her on a whaling voyage to the sperm fishery, arriving back in Sydney in April 1833 with 80 tons of oil. By 1836 her command had transferred to Captain Catlin and he sailed her around the coasts of Southland and Otago and the islands in Foveaux Strait transporting oil and delivering stores to Johnny Jonesís many shore stations. When she arrived in Sydney in November 1836 Genii had on board 1000 barrels of oil.
Glide
In September 1829 Captain Henry Archer brought his ship Glide into the Bay of Islands. Glideís home port was Salem, and they had come to the Pacific via Good Hope in search for beche de mer and sandalwood which they hoped to obtain cargoes of from the islands. Glide stayed at the Bay for one week, just enough time to refresh and replenish. 
Glory
When Captain Brown of Glory called at Codfish Island in Foveaux Strait in 1825, it has already become a permanent settlement for sealers with several Europeans residing there. Captain Brown married a local girl and as there were no men of the church in the south at this time, it would have been a Maori ceremony. Two years later in May 1827 residents and visitors at the Bay of Islands were astounded when a sealerís long boat arrived having journeyed eight hundred miles in five months from the Chathams. The men said they had been crew of Glory and were forced to make their escape on a long boat after the ship had run aground on Pitt Island.  Samuel, which was leaving the Bay when the sealers arrived, took all hands onboard and delivered them to Port Jackson. 
Golconda
American whaler from New Bedford, Captain Brock, arrived at the Bay of Islands 22 December 1822 in company with another New Bedford Whaler Winslow. Gloconda arrived back at the Bay seven months later, with a full cargo of whale oil. 
Governor Bligh
In 1815 sailors from the sealer Governor Bligh left their ship on Banks Peninsula and went ashore. In doing so they became the first known European men to set foot on the peninsula. Their captain was John Grono. 
Governor Bourke
In 1837 while working off New Zealandís southern coast, Governor Bourke had a close call when she went ashore but her crew managed to relaunch her after which she sailed to Otago for repairs and to load oil bound for Sydney.  When Lynx was lost at New River her survivors were sent to Stewart Island where they stayed until Governor Bourke arrived and took them back to Sydney. The following year Governor Bourke was recorded as being amongst the many ships that called for hospitality and shelter at Bluff Harbour. 
Governor Macquarie
Governor Macquarie was a trading vessel from Port Jackson that traded around New Zealand and the Pacific Islands in the 1820s.  On Christmas Eve 1820 she arrived at the Bay of Islands with Captain Henry. She had been trading around the coast and was on her way to Tahiti. When Governor Macquarie next called at the Bay in 1824 Captain Hunter was her master and she had come from Sydney trading. By November 1827 Captain J.R. Kent was in charge of Governor Macquarie and he brought her into the bay from trading in Hokianga. The following February Captain Kent arrived again at the Bay this time on the way back from trading in Tonga.  Kent made several more calls to the Bay of Islands with Governor Macquarie during trading voyages around the coast of New Zealand and the Pacific. Her cargos included pork, flax, seal skins, spars and potatoes. 
Governor Bourke
Governor Macquarie
General Wellesley
General Wellesley called at the Bay of Islands in 1807 while Captain Dalrymple was on the lookout for a good source of timber for spars. Here he enlisted the help of the Bayís resident European George Bruce who had arrived the previous year on Lady Nelson, and who agreed to help the captain obtain his cargo. Bruce boarded the ship with his Maori wife and their newborn baby daughter, with the intention of disembarking with his family when the ship was at North Cape. The captain at least kept to his word at first, attempting but failing to land the small party. Cruelly, he then put his back to the wind and turned his ship towards India, where she finally arrived nine months later. Once in India, George Bruce made his way ashore to complain of his familyís treatment to the Governor. While doing so, Captain Dalrymple again showed his true colours and sailed out of the harbour with Bruceís wife and child still aboard. George Bruce determined to find his family, followed the General Wellesley to Prince of Wales Island (Penang) in Malaysia. Arriving three months later he was reunited with his family before returning to India where he was given passage onboard a vessel to Australia. Finally reaching Sydney in 1809, what should have been a happy ending for the family turned to tragedy when George Bruceís wife died and their daughter was placed in an orphanage. George then joined HMS Porpoise on which he sailed back to England where he joined the Royal Navy for four years. George Bruce died in Greenwich Hospital for retired, wounded and disabled sailors in 1819.
Granger
An English whaling ship that arrived at the Bay of Islands in February 1821 to take on supplies before departing for the whale fishery, Captain Creal.
Gratitude
Gratitude was an American whaler from New Bedford that spent two months in Foveaux Strait on a whaling cruise in 1836.  During her time in the south, Gratitude made calls at Chalky Sound, Bluff and Patersonís River, Stewart Island. By May she was reported to be full and bound for home.
Granger
Gratitude
Greenwich
When Captain Law registered his ship's arrival with Sydney custom officials in 1803, he was the first to do so having come from New Zealand. Greenwich carried 209 tons of oil most of which had been procured off the coast of New Zealand. She wasn't alone in her venturing, having seen Harriet, Albion, Alexander and Venus during her cruise.  While Greenwich was in Sydney, Venus arrived with 1400 barrels of oil, and two months later they sail together  for England. 
Greenwich
General Wellesley
Guide
In August 1831 Captain Ashmore sailed his ship Guide from Sydney, registering his intended destination as Cook Strait.  During these days ships moved freely around the coast of New Zealand and this particular voyage was an eventful journey for Guide and her crew. On August 31 Junoís Captain Peterson murdered one of his crewmen by the name of Johnson while at Banks Peninsula, Guide also having been there at the time. On arriving in Cook Strait, Captain Ashmore arrested Captain Peterson for murder. Two weeks later Guide was on hand to assist by providing tools for repairs when Vittoria struck rocks in Tauranga and suffered damage.   In 1833 Captain Buckle arrived in Sydney on Guide, having taken 65 tuns of sperm oil from the South Sea fisheries. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Guide
 
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